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, ceo and cofounder. we always love when people come back to the united states. so far you have just begun the process. talk about you do and why you chose china as a place to do it. you do led lighting. how long were you in china and why did you choose to go there originally? >> well, first of all, thanks for having me, dave, liz. we chose to go to china, we first opened in 2007 in china. we did a lot of engineering stuff over there because the costs were obviously a lot cheaper. and really what we concentrated on in 2000 was expanding there quite a bit. since, since 2009 we've really, we've really looked at our costs and even though it is a lot cheaper for to us manufacture products in china we've done the proper social thing about bringing businesses back to the u.s.. david: so tell us, first of all exactly how much of a loss, i mean, essentially you are going to be paying more by higher labor costs, will you not, coming into the united states? >> yeah, we're paying more but you know, there is field expenses too have that gone up which makes china knot appealing to us and also the
together since both the united states federal reserve and the bank of japan lored interest rate policy and put in additional stimulus in the global economy. last night silver and gold cracked, and there were a lot of people shaking their heads as to why the metals cracked, and there is perhaps talk out there there were large derivative positions out there that perhaps silver gets above $36 an ounce, you could see a large short covering trade. so be careful. but the fact that gold and silver cracked in this global, aggressive central bank easing campaign doesn't make sense either. david: no, no. of course, it was a crack. it may come back. john, we're going to be talking more to you when the s&p futures close in just about ten minutes. thank you, john. liz: thanks john. let's bring in maury, chief investment officer of relative value partners and david steinberg. both these gentlemen a lot of experience in the markets and a lot of money that they work with. david, you're a bit more optimistic right now, and as we look at the s&p 500 which is certainly up over the past year, pretty stron
. plunging 4%. david: united states ambassador to the united nations and ambassador to libya presented two different views of events that led to the death of our ambassador and three others. take a listen. >> that information is the best assessment we have today in fact this was not a pre-planned, premeditated attack. >> the way they acted, leaves us with no doubt that this is preplanned, predetermined. david: to exactly different answers to that question. it could lead to billions of dollars of investment for libya, something of great interest to our next guest. a member of the libyan royal family joining us now, good to see you again, thank you for coming in. on whose side do you fall on this issue? the president of libya or the u.s. ambassador? was it a planned attack or was it spontaneous? >> it was a planned event which was the work of qaddafi supporters. they have no shame in want to disrupt the democratic process in libya that have taken place right now. david: if it was a planned event, and we know that particular consulate was under increased threat over the past week or so, she d
thing about british health care, it was messy awful hospital compared to any i've been to in the united states but they have 1/10 as many malpractice suits. because the loser pays. if you bring a frivolous lawsuit you have to pay. should we have the system here. >> i think so. we have number of corrections to make. wouldn't hurt the person who had the hurt if you will. might take a little bit, a few dollars out of the lawyers revenues from that but it's the right way to go. if you have courts which are professional courts that know what they're doing and sort out the questionable claims from the real claims that would be a big help. the other aspect just to say. david: sure. >> you both get reduction in premiums and get less defensive medicine which is extremely costly. david: a lot of these things are keeping a lot of doctors out of practice. some people are pulling in their shingles. they're leaving practice entirely. a lot of people who might have thought about many billioning doctors are not becoming doctors. we have a terrible shortage. look at this, $130,000 short by 2015. that is
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4